What I Wish I Had Known Before Adopting: Preparing for Adoption and Dispelling Adoption Myths

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Are you tired of dreading dinner? You are not alone, and there is hope! Foster and adopted children often face additional challenges and difficult beginnings. In this free webinar, parents learn about how to help their child navigate the holidays. Topics include how to help your child cope with triggering attachment issues and navigating emotions and family dynamics in a healthy manner. We also discuss ways that you can integrate rituals and traditions into your family life.

Certificates of attendance are available to those who attend. This webinar, presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is to inform adoption service providers and parents on international travel health recommendations and required overseas medical exam processes, and other CDC resources available when adopting a child internationally.

Are you considering whether adopting an older child is a good fit for your family? Are you in the midst of preparing for school-aged children to join your family? Have you completed the adoption of an older child, and need fresh ideas as you face challenges parenting your child? As the age of children waiting for adoptive families increases, many families are considering or preparing for the adoption of school-aged children.

There are many challenges to parenting children adopted at older ages. Older children require families who are committed to parenting their children in unique ways, and who are understanding of the trauma that their child has experienced prior to adoptive placement.

Ashli Carnicelli

But with this extra dedication, families can experience wonderful joy and love. This free webinar covers what you need to know about adoption and HIV, including: preparation, treatment, and disclosure.


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Free introductory webinars The following webinars will be very useful to families considering adoption or foster care and professionals serving families who are interested in growing their family in these ways. Adopt from China. Adopt from India. Adopt from South Korea.

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This webinar is useful for prospective adoptive families and child welfare professionals. Openness in International Adoption. Openness in Domestic Infant Adoption. Openness in Foster Care Adoption. Adoption Tax Credit. Anxiety and Depression in Foster and Adopted Youth. Talking About Adoption. Understanding Your Adopted Child's Behavior. This webinar will be useful for all adoptive parents and adoption professionals.

Adoption Dynamics in the Hospital for hospital staff and professionals. Debt-Free Adoption. Trauma: What You Need to Know. In this free webinar, Molly Ticknor and Dena Sneed: Define trauma: what it is, its effect on the brain, and its systemic impact Identify and explain the Trauma-Informed Care TIC movement Outline common behaviors that may be witnessed in children who have experienced trauma Discuss the high prevalence of trauma experienced by adoptive and foster care youth, and how being in the system can in itself create trauma Provide a few practical tips and supplementary handouts for approaching the effects of trauma that families and professionals can start using immediately This webinar is useful for adoptive parents, foster parents, parents preparing to bring home an adoptive or foster child, and professionals serving these families and youth.

Parenting from a Hard Place. Waiting in Adoption. Post Adoption Blues.

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Am I Good Enough? Adoption and Self-Esteem. Holidays and Triggers. Whose Story is This? Protecting Your Child's Privacy. International Travel Health Recommendations and Exams.

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This webinar will be useful for international adoptive parents and professionals. Cookies This site uses cookies: Find out more. Section 6 amends section 16 of the Act and replaces the term "father" with "relevant non-guardian" in order that each person who is included in the definition of relevant non-guardian may give notice of his or her wish to be consulted on an application for an adoption order by a mother, step-parent or relative of a child.

Section 7 replaces the term "father" with "relevant non-guardian" in section 17 of the Act in order that each person who is included in the definition of relevant non-guardian is included in the category of persons with whom consultation is required prior to the placement of a child for adoption. As the term "relevant non-guardian" has been widened, within each case we need to insert it as distinct from the term "father". Section 8 is another example as it substitutes section 18 of the Act to replace the term "father" with "relevant non-guardian". Section 9 amends section 19 of the Act by substituting a new section 19 to reflect Article 42A of the Constitution and to provide that in any matter, application or proceedings under the Act before the Adoption Authority of Ireland or any court, the authority or the court, as the case may be, shall have regard to the best interests of the child as the paramount consideration in the resolution of such matter, application or proceedings.

The section also provides that in the resolution of any matter, application or proceedings referred to in the section, the authority or court, as the case may be, shall, in respect of any child who is capable of forming his or her own views, ascertain those views and such views shall be given due weight having regard to the age and maturity of the child.

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One can imagine a child whose universe includes parents, prospective adoptive parents, a guardian or guardians and relevant non-guardians. In that context, it is very important to ensure the best interests of the child in that circle are considered and that his or her views are heard and given due weight. I intend to enter into a consultation process with children before the drafting of these regulations. This is the norm in the Department of Children and Youth Affairs on matters of such importance and I look forward to the results of that consultation.

Section 10 amends section 20 of the Act to enable the Adoption Authority of Ireland to make an adoption order in respect of civil partners or a couple who have been cohabiting for over three years if they have been assessed as eligible and suitable to adopt. This represents a big change. It also provides for an inter-country adoption undertaken outside the State to be recognised where the adopting couple are civil partners or cohabitants who have cohabited together for over three years.

~ Building Bridges to Adoptions Truths ~

Section 11 amends section 21 of the Act by substituting a new subsection 2 to provide that the Child and Family Agency shall give notice of discontinuance of adoption proceedings to the authority, to any adoption committee concerned, to the mother or any other guardian and to each relevant non-guardian of a child. Section 12 amends section 23 of the Act to extend the eligibility for adoption to any child residing in the State who is under the age of 18 years and has been in the care of the applicants for the prescribed period.

The section also deletes the reference to the eligibility for adoption in respect of a child who is an "orphan" - I wonder when was the last time Members heard that word - or who is "born of parents not married to each other". This is a very significant change, reflecting how society has moved on.

Section 13 amends section 30 of the Act to replace the term "father" with "relevant non-guardian" in order that all persons included in the definition of relevant non-guardian are persons with whom consultation is required under the section. In the drafting of the Bill it was important to ensure clarity on whose consent would be required in the adoption process. Section 14 amends section 31 of the Act by substituting a new section 31 to provide that in circumstances where a child has been placed with prospective adopters and where, prior to the final adoption order being made, a person whose consent to the making of the adoption order is necessary fails or refuses to give consent or withdraws consent already given, the applicants may apply to the High Court for an order giving custody of the child to the applicants for such period as the court may determine and authorising the authority to dispense with the consent to the making of an adoption order in favour of the applicants.

This is one of the many examples in the Bill of a thinking-through on the part of those drafting the Bill, in my Department and the Office of the Attorney General, of the consequences of what is being written with the aim of ensuring the bests interests of the child are to the fore.

In these circumstances, the section provides that the High Court shall have regard to the relationship between the child and the applicants, the child and his or her mother or guardian and the efforts made by any of those persons to develop or maintain such a relationship and any proposed arrangement of either the applicants and the mother or guardian for the future care of the child.

The section also provides that the High Court shall, in so far as is practicable, give due weight to the views of the child, having regard to his or her age and maturity. Section 15 amends section 32 of the Act to provide that the authority shall not make an adoption order in circumstances where the child, the applicant or applicants for an adoption order and every person whose consent to the adoption is required under section 26 of the Act are not all of the same religion, if of any religion, unless every person whose consent is required to that adoption knows, when so consenting, the religion, if any, of the applicant or applicants.

Section 16 amends section 33 of the Act to provide that a couple who are civil partners of each other, a cohabiting couple and a step-parent of a child are included in the categories of persons eligible to apply for an adoption order or for the recognition of an adoption order effected outside the State. Section 17 amends section 34 of the Act to bring forward the provisions of section of the Children and Family Relationships Act into the Bill to provide that a couple who are civil partners of each other and a cohabiting couple are included in the categories of persons whose suitability for an adoption order or for the recognition of an adoption order effected outside the State must be satisfactory to the Adoption Authority of Ireland.

Section 18 amends section 37 of the Act to provide that civil partners, a cohabiting couple and a step-parent are included in the categories of persons who may apply to the Child and Family Agency for an assessment of eligibility and suitability. Section 19 amends section 38 of the Act by providing that the Child and Family Agency shall give notice of the discontinuance of an application for assessment under section 37 1 to the authority, the adoption committee concerned, the mother or any other guardian of the child and to each relevant non-guardian.

Section 20 amends section 40 of the Act by providing that civil partners and a cohabiting couple are included in the categories of persons in whose favour the authority may issue a declaration of eligibility and suitability. There was a time when that was not the case.

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Actually, there still is. This change is only being introduced. Section 21 brings the provisions of section or the Children and Family Relationships Act into section 41 of the Act to provide that civil partners and a cohabiting couple are included in the categories of persons in whose favour the authority may extend the time period of the declaration of eligibility and suitability. Section 22 amends section 43 of the Act to provide that a relevant non-guardian is included in the category of persons entitled to be heard by the authority on the application for an adoption order, as well as any guardian.

Section 23 amends section 45 of the Act in order to clarify that a child who was adopted may have a further adoption order made in respect of him or her and that, in those circumstances, the child shall be taken as the lawful child of the first-mentioned adopters. Section 24 amends section 54 of the Act to provide for revised criteria, under which the High Court may authorise the making of an adoption order without parental consent where a child's parents have failed in their duty towards him or her. This is significant.


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Under the revised criteria, the child must be in the custody of and have a home with the applicants for a continuous period of not less than 18 months and the High Court must be satisfied that the parents of the child have failed in their duty for a period of 36 months and that there is no reasonable prospect that the parents will be able to care for the child in a manner that will not prejudicially affect his or her safety or welfare. These are heavy responsibilities.

Section 25 amends section 58 of the Act to provide that, upon an adoption order being made, an adopted child shall be considered, with regard to the rights and duties of parents and children in respect of one another, as the child of the adopter or adopters and that the child's mother, guardian or relevant non-guardian shall lose all parental rights and be freed from parental duties in respect of the child. Section 26 inserts a new section 58A into the Act to provide that a child's mother or guardian shall not lose all parental rights in respect of his or her child where the child is adopted by a step-parent.

The section provides that a child who is adopted by his or her step-parent shall, upon the making of an adoption order, be regarded as the child of that step-parent and the step-parent's spouse, civil partner or cohabitant. Section 27 amends section 59 of the Act to replace the term "birth parents" with "parents". Regarding property rights, section 28 provides that, for the purposes of section 60 of the Act, an adopted person is to be regarded as the child of his or her adopter and not his or her pre-adoption parents.